cmarzano
cmarzano posted on cmarzano/dsa-90
2015-09-20 20:37:07 -0700
5 months @ feeding time.
5 months @ feeding time.
cmarzano
cmarzano posted on cmarzano/dsa-90
2015-08-01 19:32:52 -0700
3.5 months progress.
3.5 months progress.
cmarzano
cmarzano posted on cmarzano/dsa-90
2015-07-06 22:52:05 -0700
June 29--2.5 months. Coming along now!
June 29--2.5 months. Coming along now!
cmarzano
cmarzano posted on cmarzano/dsa-90
2015-05-25 14:54:51 -0700
May 25, 1.5 months.
May 25, 1.5 months.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Ocellaris Clownfish
2015-05-19 23:04:27 -0700
The **Ocellaris Clownfish**, also known as the **False Percula Clownfish**, **False Clown Anemonefish**, and **Anemone Demoiselle**, is found associating with anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific. It can attain a length of 3.2" (8 cm) in the wild, but aquarium specimens rarely exceed 2" (5 cm) unless they are imported large. This fish is sometimes sold as the Percula Clown, even though it is not. The color pattern is very similar, but it is not as bright orange. The black outlines on the white stripes are also thinner on the Ocellaris Clown when compared to the Percula. Generally, Ocellaris clownfish are hardier, and slightly less aggressive than its Percula counterpart. Both species are found in coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, particularly in the Fiji and Tonga regions. It is a long-lived clownfish that is excellent for the beginner hobbyist. It does best in the presence of anemones such as Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla gigantea. Like the related damselfish, it is well-suited for all but the most predatory tanks.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Blue Tang
2015-05-19 23:04:16 -0700
_**Paracanthurus hepatus**_ is a species of Indo-Pacific surgeonfish. A popular fish in marine aquaria, it is the only member of the genus _**Paracanthurus**_. A number of common names are attributed to the species, including **regal tang**, **palette surgeonfish**, **blue tang** (leading to confusion with the Atlantic _Acanthurus coeruleus_), **royal blue tang**, **hippo tang**, **flagtail surgeonfish**, **pacific regal blue tang** and **blue surgeonfish**. Description _Paracanthurus hepatus_ has a royal blue body, yellow tail, and black 'palette' design. The lower body is yellow in the west-central Indian Ocean. It grows to 30 cm (12 in.). This fish is rather flat, like a pancake, with a circular body shape, a pointed snout-like nose, and small scales. The blue tang has 9 dorsal spines, 26-28 dorsal soft rays, 3 anal spines, and 24-26 anal soft rays. Ecology
cmarzano
cmarzano created aquarium DSA 90
2015-04-12 16:14:13 -0700
cmarzano
cmarzano posted on Hammer / Anchor Coral
2014-04-19 02:19:33 -0700
cmarzano
The Wildwood Bottle Brush Acropora Coral has horizontal main branches with upward projecting branchlets of fairly uniform height. The color variety is green, usually with cream or yellow tips as it matures. The Wildwood Bottle Brush Acropora Coral prefers a high light level of at least 5 watts per gallon provided by metal halide lighting combined with strong intermittent water current within the aquarium. For continued good health, it will require the addition of a two part calcium and buffer supplement in order to maintain a calcium level of 400-450 ppm and dKH of 8-12. It will benefit from the addition of zooplankton.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Ocellaris Clownfish
2013-12-28 02:58:24 -0800
The **Ocellaris Clownfish**, also known as the **False Percula Clownfish**, **False Clown Anemonefish**, and **Anemone Demoiselle**, is found associating with anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific. It can attain a length of 3.2" (8 cm) in the wild, but aquarium specimens rarely exceed 2" (5 cm) unless they are imported large. This fish is sometimes sold as the Percula Clown, even though it is not. The color pattern is very similar, but it is not as bright orange. The black outlines on the white stripes are also thinner on the Ocellaris Clown when compared to the Percula. Generally, Ocellaris clownfish are hardier, and slightly less aggressive than its Percula counterpart. Both species are found in coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, particularly in the Fiji and Tonga regions. It is a long-lived clownfish that is excellent for the beginner hobbyist. It does best in the presence of anemones such as Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla gigantea. Like the related damselfish, it is well-suited for all but the most predatory tanks.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Tooth Coral
2013-11-23 22:05:43 -0800
The Galaxea Coral is a large polyp stony (LPS) coral and often referred to as the Tooth, Star, Crystal, Starburst, Brittle, or Galaxy Coral. Its genus name, Galaxea, is derived from the Greek word galaxaios (milky), describing the polyp's milky-white tips. While bright green is the most common, some species can be found in a variety of colors. It is an aggressive coral in the reef aquarium, and therefore, needs adequate space between itself and other corals. Its polyps can extend up to several inches at night and will sting and cause damage to other species of corals that it can reach. The Tooth Coral requires strong lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. For continued good health, it will also require the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Brain Coral, Favites
2013-10-17 23:59:49 -0700
The Favites Corals are large polyp stony (LPS) corals often referred to as Moon, Pineapple, Brain, Closed Brain, Star, Worm, or Honeycomb Coral. They are the most common and prolific coral in the world, and are very similar to the genus Favia, sharing many of the same common names, and sometimes being very difficult to differentiate. Favites Corals are found in various color forms and polyp shapes. "Pineapple Coral" is the name commonly given to those that have smaller circular patterns. The Favites Corals are aggressive, expanding their sweeper tentacles at night well beyond the base. It is important to leave space between them and neighbors in the reef aquarium. Maintenance for the Favites Corals is relatively easy, making them excellent choices for the beginner to expert hobbyist. They require moderate lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. For continued good health, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements should be added to the water. It will also benefit from the addition of supplemental food in the form of micro-plankton or brine shrimp, fed twice per week in the evening while its tentacles are visible.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Ocellaris Clownfish
2013-10-06 20:31:47 -0700
The **Ocellaris Clownfish**, also known as the **False Percula Clownfish**, **False Clown Anemonefish**, and **Anemone Demoiselle**, is found associating with anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific. It can attain a length of 3.2" (8 cm) in the wild, but aquarium specimens rarely exceed 2" (5 cm) unless they are imported large. This fish is sometimes sold as the Percula Clown, even though it is not. The color pattern is very similar, but it is not as bright orange. The black outlines on the white stripes are also thinner on the Ocellaris Clown when compared to the Percula. Generally, Ocellaris clownfish are hardier, and slightly less aggressive than its Percula counterpart. Both species are found in coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, particularly in the Fiji and Tonga regions. It is a long-lived clownfish that is excellent for the beginner hobbyist. It does best in the presence of anemones such as Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla gigantea. Like the related damselfish, it is well-suited for all but the most predatory tanks.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Branching Frogspawn Coral
2013-10-06 20:30:41 -0700
The Frogspawn Coral is a large polyp stony coral (LPS) often referred to as the Wall, Octopus, Grape, or Honey Coral. Its polyps remain visible throughout both the day and night, resembling a mass of fish eggs or frog eggs, hence one of its common names Frogspawn. Its coloration is green or brown to tan in color. With its appearance and coloration it would make a nice addition to any reef aquarium. During the evenings, its sweeper tentacles can extend up to six inches beyond its base into the reef aquarium surroundings. It will sting other neighboring corals in the reef aquarium, therefore, it is best to leave plenty of room between itself and other types of corals. It is moderately difficult to maintain, but it is a popular coral that will thrive under the proper conditions. It will need to have moderate to heavy lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. For continued good health, it will also require the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
cmarzano
cmarzano updated Nassarius Snail
2013-09-27 01:56:11 -0700
The Nassarius Snail is a small scavenger with an oval, spiral shell that resembles an olive pit. The Nassarius Snail likes to burrow in the sand, usually with its long, tube-like siphon protruding from the substrate. As it searches for food, the Nassarius Snail helps prevent compaction and aerates aquarium substrate. The Nassarius Snail prefers an established aquarium with live rock and a deep sand bed. It is sensitive to high nitrate levels and copper-based medications. The Nassarius Snail is extremely difficult to breed in captivity.

Aquariums