Male
Male

Ancistrus is a genus of freshwater fish in the family Loricariidae. Fish of this genus are commonly known as the bushynose or bristlenose plecos.

Ancistrus species show all the typical features of the Loricariidae. This includes a body covered in bony plates and a ventral suckermouth. The feature most commonly associated with the genus are the fleshy tentacles found on the head in adult males; females may possess tentacles along the snout margin but they are smaller and they lack tentacles on the head. Males also have evertible cheek odontodes which are less developed or absent in females. They also lack odontodes along the snout.

In comparison with a typical pleco, a bristlenose is typically shorter (15 cm or less), more flattened and fatter with a comparatively wider head. Colouration is typically mottled brown, grey or black. Small white or yellow spots are common. Unlike other plecos which commonly grow to over a foot long, the bristlenose pleco may only grow to half the size, this makes it a suitable species of pleco for the smaller tank.

Males of these species are competitive and territorial. Males display to each other by positioning themselves parallel to each other, head to tail, with dorsal and caudal fins erect and cheek odontode spines everted. If this escalates to combat, the males will circle each other and direct attacks at the head. If an intruding male manages to evict another male from the nest, it may cannibalize the other male's young.

A male bristlenose may guard several clutches of eggs simultaneously. Females prefer males that are already protecting eggs and may prefer males that are protecting larvae; it has been suggested that the tentacles may act as a fry mimic to attract females, which would allow males without eggs in their nest to compete with males guarding eggs.[3] Several clutches in various states of development from eggs to free-swimming larvae can be found in one nest.

In the aquarium

These fish are often kept by aquarists as they are dutiful algae-eaters and smaller in adult size than the common plecos usually seen in petshops. Size is up to 15 cm (male), 12 cm (female), recommended temperature 23-27 degrees Celsius, lifespan up to 12 years. They are hardy animals, tolerant to a wide range of water conditions, breeding easily in captivity, compatible with most other freshwater fish, though typically mottled brown in colour, other species are more exotic - spots of bright yellow on a dark background being a common patternation, albino variants are also common. The albino morph is not caused by exposure to light during development, it is a morph controlled by genetics.

Feeding is easy, bristlenoses will graze on algae and other surface growing organisms as well as eating algae wafers or tablets, flake food, squash, spinach, cucumber, zucchini, green beans and peas however they have been known to accept frozen bloodworms as part of their diet. Aquarium specimens may starve for lack of algae or other plant matter; algae wafers or other low-protein foods are recommended. Keepers should watch for the abdomen to take on a sunken appearance, indicating insufficient nutrition.

Like other plecs benefit from the addition of bogwood, which they will rasp at and use as a hiding place - in the absence of other plant matter (sources of fibre) wood may be essential to the survival of these fish in the aquarium as it helps digestion of typically high protein fish food.

Sexing is very easy as the female will occasionally have bristles around the edge of the chin and the male will have them up the center of the head.

Breeding is also possible: Males attract females to small cave or hollow, then guard eggs after fertilization through hatching (4–8 days) until fry are free swimming (4–6 days after hatching); the aquarist need only supply a suitable cave, food, and one of each sex.

Caution should be taken with the spines (odontodes) - although the risk of personal injury is small with this genus the hooked nature of the odontodes means that a bristlenose may become trapped in non-natural material such as sponge filters and netting.

Source: wikipedia

This is a shy species that tends to hide when not looking for food. They are great algae eaters that are preferred over common plecos because they do not grow very large. Bog wood must be added to the tank when keeping Bristlenose pleco; they will gnaw at it as part of their diet. Males will become territorial as they mature so it is best to keep one fish of each sex.

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bubble posted on Bristlenose Pleco
2013-03-05 15:29:36 -0500
Albino
Albino
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bubble updated Bristlenose Pleco
2013-02-27 20:53:47 -0500
_Ancistrus_ is a genus of freshwater fish in the family _Loricariidae_. Fish of this genus are commonly known as the **bushynose** or **bristlenose plecos**. Ancistrus species show all the typical features of the Loricariidae. This includes a body covered in bony plates and a ventral suckermouth. The feature most commonly associated with the genus are the fleshy tentacles found on the head in adult males; females may possess tentacles along the snout margin but they are smaller and they lack tentacles on the head. Males also have evertible cheek odontodes which are less developed or absent in females. They also lack odontodes along the snout. In comparison with a typical pleco, a bristlenose is typically shorter (15 cm or less), more flattened and fatter with a comparatively wider head. Colouration is typically mottled brown, grey or black. Small white or yellow spots are common. Unlike other plecos which commonly grow to over a foot long, the bristlenose pleco may only grow to half the size, this makes it a suitable species of pleco for the smaller tank.
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bubble updated Bristlenose Pleco
2013-02-27 17:45:11 -0500
_Ancistrus_ is a genus of freshwater fish in the family _Loricariidae_. Fish of this genus are commonly known as the **bushynose** or **bristlenose plecos**. Ancistrus species show all the typical features of the Loricariidae. This includes a body covered in bony plates and a ventral suckermouth. The feature most commonly associated with the genus are the fleshy tentacles found on the head in adult males; females may possess tentacles along the snout margin but they are smaller and they lack tentacles on the head. Males also have evertible cheek odontodes which are less developed or absent in females. They also lack odontodes along the snout. In comparison with a typical pleco, a bristlenose is typically shorter (15 cm or less), more flattened and fatter with a comparatively wider head. Colouration is typically mottled brown, grey or black. Small white or yellow spots are common. Unlike other plecos which commonly grow to over a foot long, the bristlenose pleco may only grow to half the size, this makes it a suitable species of pleco for the smaller tank.
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bubble posted on Bristlenose Pleco
2013-02-27 17:33:26 -0500
Bristlenose Pleco
 
Female
Female
Male
Male

Fish Specs

Scientific Name
Other Name
Family
Loricariidae
Environment
Fresh
Min Tank Size
70 gallons
Max Size
12.0 in.
Chemistry
6.2 - 7.7 pH
Temperature
73 - 84 °F
Temperament
Peaceful
Difficulty
Easy

Tanks (2)

Kitchen planted tank - Fresh water Aquarium Planted Community - Fresh water Aquarium