Cherub Angelfish
 

The cherubfish, or pygmy angelfish (Centropyge argi) is a gentle omnivorous marine angelfish, with a metallic blue body and yellow to orange colouration in parts of the head only. It is native to the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, and has a maximum length of 8 cm. It is easily confused with the orangeback angelfish (Centropyge acanthops), but in the latter the orange stripe extends across the back.

When kept in an aquarium, cherubfish are distributed throughout the tank. They prefer reef tanks to fish only tanks. But like other angel fish, they are not completely 100% reef-safe. Results vary among individual fish and tank qualities (size, feeding, tankmates, etc.). In summary, be cautious when adding this fish to a coral tank!

Source: wikipedia

Although Dwarf Angelfish are smaller and generally more manageable than their larger counterparts, they still have some specific care requirements. They are omnivores, but plenty of vegetable matter, preferably in the form of macroalgae, should be provided for their grazing pleasure. Their suitability for reef tanks is hotly debated, so add at your own risk. Specimens that have been successfully maintained in reef aquaria include the Flame and Coral Beauty angels. However, for obvious reasons they should not be put into tanks with expensive decorative macroalgae.

Source: wikipedia

Centropyge (common name: dwarf angelfish) is a genus of marine angelfishes. The genus is the largest within the Pomacanthid family, comprising over 30 described species. Species in this group do not exceed 15 cm (approximately six inches) in length and live in haremic structures with one dominant male and multiple females. Although it is hard to identify their gender; females are often shorter and more round finned (which is more obvious when looking at a group of specimens). Like many other reef fish and all marine angelfish, species in this genus are protogynous hermaphrodites, meaning that they start their adult lives as females and the dominant individual in a group can change to a male within days. A reversal of this sex change is possible if the social status of the individual changes, it is however a process that requires much more time (weeks to months).

In aquaria

Centropyge prefer matured reef tanks due to the usually high water quality and the often used "live rock". In nature most Centropyge sp. feed on algae, sponges and small benthic invertebrates. Having an abundance of well cured live rock will help to supplement their diet. This is also in the interest of the aquarist, as underfed _ angels may nip at corals and sessile invertebrates. The difficulty of keeping varies from species to species, as does their rarity and correspondingly their price. Centropyge are social species that live in loose groups in the wild. So if multiple Centropyge are kept to a tank, they will establish a pecking order. To reduce the stresses of establishing the dominance in the group it is wise to choose semi-adult specimens or specimens of different size. Aggression levels differ considerably between species, which should be taken into account when trying to house more than one species per tank (adapting the stocking list and order of addition to the tank). Dwarf angels can be quite shy initially, hiding in corals, caves and crevices but become more outgoing when they have established their territory - if they are kept with appropriate tank mates and in appropriately sized tanks.

Source: wikipedia

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bubble posted on Cherub Angelfish
2013-02-09 21:23:41 -0800
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bubble updated Cherub Angelfish
2013-02-09 21:22:36 -0800
The **cherubfish**, or **pygmy angelfish** (_Centropyge argi_) is a gentle omnivorous marine angelfish, with a metallic blue body and yellow to orange colouration in parts of the head only. It is native to the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, and has a maximum length of 8 cm. It is easily confused with the orangeback angelfish (_Centropyge acanthops_), but in the latter the orange stripe extends across the back. When kept in an aquarium, cherubfish are distributed throughout the tank. They prefer reef tanks to fish only tanks. But like other angel fish, they are not completely 100% reef-safe. Results vary among individual fish and tank qualities (size, feeding, tankmates, etc.). In summary, be cautious when adding this fish to a coral tank! Source: wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centropyge_argi Although **Dwarf Angelfish** are smaller and generally more manageable than their larger counterparts, they still have some specific care requirements. They are omnivores, but plenty of vegetable matter, preferably in the form of macroalgae, should be provided for their grazing pleasure.

Fish Specs

Scientific Name
Family
Pomacanthidae
Environment
Salt
Min Tank Size
30 gallons
Max Size
3.0 in.
Chemistry
8.1 - 8.4 pH
Temperature
72 - 78 °F
Temperament
Semi-Aggressive
Diet
Omnivore
Difficulty
Moderate
Origin
Caribbean
Reef Safe
No