This is not my photo, though I might try and add my own later
This is not my photo, though I might try and add my own later

A fish originating from protected areas of the reef with sandy bottoms and limited wave action, the Cockatoo waspfish naturally hops along these areas hunting small shrimp and most other small crustaceans (that means it will eat ornamental shrimp that will fit in its mouth). While it is used to sandy bottoms it very easily adapts to climbing live rock and will not restrict itself to the sand bed. However, due to its body shape and general physiology it does have issues in really strong current and so that should be avoided or at the very least turned off during its more active hours. When on the hunt it will often sway like a piece of kelp and use it fins to angle itself to align its mouth with its prey. While it is peaceful with its tank mates, except those of the same gender of its species, and generally just ignores them it is advised to not keep them with more aggressive eaters as it will have a hard time getting food. While they are not the best swimmers, partly due to the lack of a swim bladder, and can seem timid once trained they are amazing eaters and will readily eat frozen foods such as mysid shrimp. If they do not initially take food when introduced try different methods, make sure to have the food descend to them (their mouth is angled that way) and try feeding when the lights are off instead. However once they get used to you feeding them they will come out and "beg" for food when they see you, watch out though when your hand is in the tank as they often will come over looking for some food.

The Cockatoo Waspfish is from the same family as scorpionfish and therefore packs a strong venom in its spines, so caution should be exercised when adding to a tank. They are not malicious though and will not go out of their way to sting you, so just keep an eye on them when doing tank work (it's not a bad idea to have someone be a spotter if the task requires concentration). If you do end up making them feel threatened they will not lunge at you, but instead tilt themselves so the their fin is over their head and all spines are pointing at you. Paying attention to these warning signs are important. Finally, if you do get stung immerse your hand in water at 114 degrees Fahrenheit, make sure not too scald yourself though, for 20 to 90 minutes and make sure to removes pieces of the spine in the wound as they can cause secondary infection. Also seek medical help if symptoms get really bad.

All in all these are great fish with tons of personality that are great eaters and also quite disease resistant due to them periodically shedding their cuticle.

Sebastion64
Sebastion64 posted on Cockatoo Waspfish
2015-08-20 19:22:50 -0400
This is not my photo, though I might try and add my own later
This is not my photo, though I might try and add my own later
Sebastion64
Sebastion64 updated Cockatoo Waspfish
2015-08-20 19:22:51 -0400
A fish originating from protected areas of the reef with sandy bottoms and limited wave action, the Cockatoo waspfish naturally hops along these areas hunting small shrimp and most other small crustaceans (that means it will eat ornamental shrimp that will fit in its mouth). While it is used to sandy bottoms it very easily adapts to climbing live rock and will not restrict itself to the sand bed. However, due to its body shape and general physiology it does have issues in really strong current and so that should be avoided or at the very least turned off during its more active hours. When on the hunt it will often sway like a piece of kelp and use it fins to angle itself to align its mouth with its prey. While it is peaceful with its tank mates, except those of the same gender of its species, and generally just ignores them it is advised to not keep them with more aggressive eaters as it will have a hard time getting food. While they are not the best swimmers, partly due to the lack of a swim bladder, and can seem timid once trained they are amazing eaters and will readily eat frozen foods such as mysid shrimp. If they do not initially take food when introduced try different methods, make sure to have the food descend to them (their mouth is angled that way) and try feeding when the lights are off instead.
Sebastion64
Sebastion64 created Cockatoo Waspfish on Cockatoo Waspfish
2015-08-20 19:22:02 -0400
A fish originating from protected areas of the reef with sandy bottoms and limited wave action, the Cockatoo waspfish naturally hops along these areas hunting small shrimp and most other small crustaceans (that means it will eat ornamental shrimp that will fit in its mouth). While it is used to sandy bottoms it very easily adapts to climbing live rock and will not restrict itself to the sand bed. However, due to its body shape and general physiology it does have issues in really strong current and so that should be avoided or at the very least turned off during its more active hours. When on the hunt it will often sway like a piece of kelp and use it fins to angle itself to align its mouth with its prey. While it is peaceful with its tank mates, except those of the same gender of its species, and generally just ignores them it is advised to not keep them with more aggressive eaters as it will have a hard time getting food. While they are not the best swimmers, partly due to the lack of a swim bladder, and can seem timid once trained they are amazing eaters and will readily eat frozen foods such as mysid shrimp. If they do not initially take food when introduced try different methods, make sure to have the food descend to them (their mouth is angled that way) and try feeding when the lights are off instead.

Fish Specs

Scientific Name
Family
Scorpaenidae
Environment
Salt
Min Tank Size
20 gallons
Max Size
5.9 in.
Chemistry
8.1 - 8.4 pH
Temperature
72 - 78 °F
Temperament
Peaceful
Diet
Carnivore
Difficulty
Moderate