Sand Sifting Sea Star
 

Astropecten polyacanthus, the sand sifting starfish or comb star, is a sea star of the family Astropectinidae. It is the most widespread species in the Astropecten genus, found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The armspread is up to 20 cm (8 in). The specific epithet "polyacanthus" comes from the Latin meaning "many thorned".

The tube feet are pointed rather than having suckers, an arrangement that is more suitable for digging. Astropecten polyacanthus can be confused with Archaster spp. which look similar because both have developed features to enable them to dig through sand through convergent evolution. Archaster has spines that are flat and blunt and on its upper surface has parallel, radial rows of plates while Astropecten polyacanthus does not.

Distribution

The comb star is found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical seas throughout the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and Zanzibar to Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia and New Zealand. It is often found on silty sand bottoms in harbours and estuaries.It is found at depths down to about 185 metres (607 ft).

Biology

The comb star spends much of its time buried in the silty seabed. It feeds on detritus and bivalve and gastropod molluscs which it swallows whole. It also sometimes engulfs pebbles and digests the biofilm and small invertebrates adhering to the surface.
Astropecten polyacanthus contains the potent neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin, also known as TTX which has no known antidote.

Use in aquaria

The comb star is sometimes kept in reef aquaria where it is efficient at clearing detritus and uneaten food from the sand or gravel. It is mostly nocturnal and needs to be acclimatized gradually to the conditions in the tank. If it is overstocked, it will starve.

Source: wikipedia

bubble
bubble updated Sand Sifting Sea Star
2013-03-06 04:05:13 -0800
Astropecten polyacanthus, the **sand sifting starfish** or **comb star**, is a sea star of the family Astropectinidae. It is the most widespread species in the Astropecten genus, found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The armspread is up to 20 cm (8 in). The specific epithet "polyacanthus" comes from the Latin meaning "many thorned". The tube feet are pointed rather than having suckers, an arrangement that is more suitable for digging. Astropecten polyacanthus can be confused with Archaster spp. which look similar because both have developed features to enable them to dig through sand through convergent evolution. Archaster has spines that are flat and blunt and on its upper surface has parallel, radial rows of plates while Astropecten polyacanthus does not. Distribution The comb star is found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical seas throughout the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and Zanzibar to Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia and New Zealand.
bubble
bubble updated Sand Sifting Sea Star
2013-01-16 22:40:10 -0800
Astropecten polyacanthus, the **sand sifting starfish** or **comb star**, is a sea star of the family Astropectinidae. It is the most widespread species in the Astropecten genus, found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The armspread is up to 20 cm (8 in). The specific epithet "polyacanthus" comes from the Latin meaning "many thorned". The tube feet are pointed rather than having suckers, an arrangement that is more suitable for digging. Astropecten polyacanthus can be confused with Archaster spp. which look similar because both have developed features to enable them to dig through sand through convergent evolution. Archaster has spines that are flat and blunt and on its upper surface has parallel, radial rows of plates while Astropecten polyacanthus does not. Distribution The comb star is found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical seas throughout the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and Zanzibar to Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia and New Zealand.
bubble
bubble updated Sand Sifting Sea Star
2012-12-18 13:42:19 -0800
Astropecten polyacanthus, the **sand sifting starfish** or **comb star**, is a sea star of the family Astropectinidae. It is the most widespread species in the Astropecten genus, found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The armspread is up to 20 cm (8 in). The specific epithet "polyacanthus" comes from the Latin meaning "many thorned". The tube feet are pointed rather than having suckers, an arrangement that is more suitable for digging. Astropecten polyacanthus can be confused with Archaster spp. which look similar because both have developed features to enable them to dig through sand through convergent evolution. Archaster has spines that are flat and blunt and on its upper surface has parallel, radial rows of plates while Astropecten polyacanthus does not. Distribution The comb star is found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical seas throughout the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and Zanzibar to Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia and New Zealand.
bubble
bubble posted on Sand Sifting Sea Star
2012-12-18 14:03:54 -0800

Invertebrate Specs

Scientific Name
Other Name
Family
Astropectinidae
Environment
Salt
Chemistry
8.1 - 8.4 pH
Temperature
72 - 78 °F
Temperament
Peaceful
Diet
Omnivore
Difficulty
Easy
Origin
Fiji, Solomon Islands
Reef Safe
Yes

Tanks (4)

Murrays Reef - Salt water Aquarium My 55 - Salt water Aquarium My 75g - Salt water Aquarium Nuvo Fusion 30L - Salt water Aquarium