bubble
bubble updated Fighting Conch
2012-12-18 14:22:26 -0800
  • Scientific Name: Strombus spp.
  • Environment: salt
  • Max Size: 4.0
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Difficulty: Easy
bubble
bubble posted on Linckia Sea Star (Blue Star)
2012-12-18 14:16:33 -0800
bubble
bubble updated Linckia Sea Star (Blue Star)
2012-12-18 14:08:47 -0800
  • Scientific Name: Linckia laevigata
  • Environment: salt
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Difficulty: Difficult
bubble
bubble updated Sand Sifting Sea Star
2012-12-18 13:42:19 -0800
Astropecten polyacanthus, the **sand sifting starfish** or **comb star**, is a sea star of the family Astropectinidae. It is the most widespread species in the Astropecten genus, found throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The armspread is up to 20 cm (8 in). The specific epithet "polyacanthus" comes from the Latin meaning "many thorned". The tube feet are pointed rather than having suckers, an arrangement that is more suitable for digging. Astropecten polyacanthus can be confused with Archaster spp. which look similar because both have developed features to enable them to dig through sand through convergent evolution. Archaster has spines that are flat and blunt and on its upper surface has parallel, radial rows of plates while Astropecten polyacanthus does not. Distribution The comb star is found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical seas throughout the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and Zanzibar to Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia and New Zealand.
bubble
bubble posted on Sand Sifting Sea Star
2012-12-18 14:03:54 -0800
bubble
bubble posted on Orangeshoulder Tang
2012-12-18 13:39:28 -0800
bubble
bubble updated Orangeshoulder Tang
2012-12-18 13:28:18 -0800
Orange Shoulder Tang (Acanthurus olivaceus) The Orangespot Surgeonfish is also known as the Orange Shoulder Tang, Orangeband Surgeonfish, and Orange-epaulette Surgeonfish. Each of these names point to the distinct and interesting feature that makes this species stand out, the bright orange horizontal band with a broad blue edge on its side. Not only is this fish quickly recognized by its orange spot or band, but it also goes through a fascinating color change as it matures. As a juvenile is solid yellow with just the slightest hint of blue edging the anal and dorsal fins. The adult looks quite different. The front half of a mature specimen is a light gray and the back half is a dark gray-blue, and its caudal fin becomes lyre shaped. In each case it still retains its shoulder marking, but the orange spot does becomes more brilliant with age. Source: [cliff1066™] (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nostri-imago/2877074984/)
bubble
bubble posted on Coral Beauty Angelfish
2012-12-18 13:25:41 -0800
bubble
bubble posted on Branching Frogspawn Coral
2012-12-18 13:10:38 -0800
bubble
bubble updated Branching Frogspawn Coral
2012-12-18 13:06:43 -0800
The Frogspawn Coral is a large polyp stony coral (LPS) often referred to as the Wall, Octopus, Grape, or Honey Coral. Its polyps remain visible throughout both the day and night, resembling a mass of fish eggs or frog eggs, hence one of its common names Frogspawn. Its coloration is green or brown to tan in color. With its appearance and coloration it would make a nice addition to any reef aquarium. During the evenings, its sweeper tentacles can extend up to six inches beyond its base into the reef aquarium surroundings. It will sting other neighboring corals in the reef aquarium, therefore, it is best to leave plenty of room between itself and other types of corals. It is moderately difficult to maintain, but it is a popular coral that will thrive under the proper conditions. It will need to have moderate to heavy lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. For continued good health, it will also require the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
bubble
bubble posted on Flower Pot Coral - Green
2012-12-18 12:55:58 -0800
bubble
bubble updated Cauliflower Coral, Brush Coral
2012-12-18 12:36:39 -0800
Pocillopora, is a genus of stony corals in the family Pocilloporidae occurring in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. They are commonly called cauliflower corals and brush corals. Description Cauliflower corals are widespread and can be identified by the presence of wart-like growths on their surface. The colonies can be dome shaped or branching and are very variable in colour and shape depending on the species and the environmental conditions. Species situated on shallow reefs pounded by the sea tend to be stunted whilst those in deep calm water are often thin and open. Each individual polyp has tentacles but these are normally extended only at night. Biology
bubble
bubble posted on Cauliflower Coral, Brush Coral
2012-12-18 12:34:01 -0800
bubble
bubble posted on Brain Coral, Pineapple
2012-12-18 11:54:11 -0800